Class Notes

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1950s

Bill Erickson (B.S., ’51), of Eaton, Colorado, is legendary in Weld County and the greater Greeley community for his decades of service as a volunteer 4-H leader. The Weld County Commissioners honored him by declaring April 23, 2018, as Bill Erickson Day in recognition of his 65 years of dedication in leading the Galeton 4-H Club, among other activities supporting the 4-H organization and its youth members. The anniversary made him the longest-serving among more than 11,000 4-H volunteers in Colorado, records show. He assumed leadership of the Galeton club just one year after graduating from CSU in agronomy. Erickson has been a lifelong dairyman and farmer; his family roots in the area trace to the 1870s, when Greeley was known as Union Colony. “I’m still enthused about 4-H and what it can do for kids in helping them develop,” he said, when accepting the Weld County honor.

Donald (B.S., ’55; D.V.M., ’57) and Jo Ann (B.S., ’58) Ostwald celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary on Dec. 21, 2018.

Boyd “Tiny” Grant (B.S., ’57; M.Ed., ’62) is retired in Pocatello, Idaho. He played baseball and basketball as a student at CSU and served as assistant Rams basketball coach for 10 years, including the 1968-1969 season, when the team made it to the Elite Eight during the NCAA tournament. He led the men’s basketball team at the College of Southern Idaho to the junior college national championship in 1982, and later returned to CSU as head coach of men’s basketball from 1987 to 1991, twice leading the Rams to the national tournament.

Grant "Tiny" Boyd (B.S., ’57; M.Ed., ’62)

1960s

Patsy (Gustamantes) Herrera (B.S., ’65) is retired in Roswell, New Mexico, after working in occupational therapy for 52 years in Colorado, California, Utah, and New Mexico. She designed and implemented the occupational therapy assistant program at Eastern New Mexico University in Roswell and served as its director for 15 years, then worked in private practice before retirement.

Fred Oglesby (B.S., ’65) played football for the Rams, then began a 32-year career as CSU’s head athletics trainer, earning induction in the CSU Athletics Hall of Fame in 2000. He is also father and grandfather to several standout Rams athletes: son Luke earned all-Western Athletic Conference honors in baseball; daughter Chris (B.S., ’90) played on Rams softball teams that dominated the WAC and ranked as high as 12th nationally; granddaughter Taylor (B.S., ’15) was a four-year standout outfielder in softball; granddaughter Haley (B.S., ’18) was a four-time all-Mountain West selection in softball and holds the CSU record for runs; and granddaughter Bridgette now plays for the softball team, which won the second Mountain West title in program history and earned an NCAA tournament appearance in May.

Clark Champney (B.S., ’66) of Vermillion, Ohio, is application development manager at Nelson Stud Welding Inc., a division of Stanley Engineered Fastening and a global market leader of welded fasteners and equipment. He earlier taught industrial arts and science in Hugo, Colo.

Linda Yoder (B.S., ’66) was honored as Colorado CattleWoman of the Year at the 2019 Mid-Winter Conference held by the Colorado Cattle Association. Yoder is a longtime member and current vice president of Lincoln County CattleWomen and is credited with tireless advocacy for the beef industry and efforts to involve younger women. Yoder, who worked as a CSU Extension agent, has raised cattle on an operation in Karval with her late husband, Harold (B.A., ’64).

Dan Roque (B.A., ’67) is substitute teaching and tutoring Spanish after retiring from a 33-year career at Cherry Creek High School.

Vivian (Lee) Kerr (B.S., ’69; M.Ed., ’77) is executive director of art museums at Southern University and A&M College in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. She earlier worked in financial aid at CSU and helped establish the University’s Academic Advancement Center and two student-support organizations, El Centro and Black Student Services, now known as the Black/African American Cultural Center. She was the first director of Black Student Services and has been honored for her trailblazing efforts to support students of color and to promote an inclusive campus environment at CSU.

1970s

Jim Scavo (B.S., ’70) is closing his downtown Fort Collins realty office after more than 40 years in the Mulberry Street location. His daughter, Laurie Scavo (B.A., ’97), who has worked with him for several years, will take over the bulk of the real estate business.

Jan Janura (B.S., ’71) of Cameron, Montana, combined his entrepreneurship and love of the outdoors to establish The Wild Adventure, a business offering guided fly-fishing trips on the Madison River in southwestern Montana. He and his wife, Carol Anderson, earlier founded Carol Anderson Inc., a West Coast women’s apparel brand. The company evolved into Carol Anderson by Invitation, or CAbi, specializing in direct-sales fashion; they sold the business in 2012.

Judith Miller (B.S., ’71; M.S., ’77) is founder and program director of Soaring Hope Recovery in Colorado Springs, which provides both addiction rehabilitation and neurotherapy treatments for people with brain injuries and mental-health concerns. She recently completed a study of veterans with neurological disorders.

Shannon Hebb (B.S., ’72) retired in December 2018 from his job as senior project manager for WSP USA, a leading international engineering and professional-services firm. Hebb, who lives near Dallas, had a 46-year career in civil engineering.

Greg (B.S., ’72) and Susan (B.A., ’73) Super are enjoying retirement in Arlington, Virginia. They had long careers with the U.S. Forest Service in Utah, Montana, and Washington, D.C. Their son, James, completed his Ph.D. in geochemistry and paleoclimate at Yale University and works for the journal Nature Geoscience.

Joel Kassiday (B.A., ’73), a former Rocky Mountain Collegian editor-in-chief, has been appointed deputy government relations director by the Zionist Organization of America. Kassiday was a top aide for almost 30 years for four U.S. representatives and two U.S. senators, including former Sen. Hank Brown and Rep. James P. Johnson. He also served as congressional affairs director at the Republican Jewish Coalition and vice president at HillStaffer, a government relations consulting firm.

John Arnolfo
John Arnolfo (B.S. '74)

John Arnolfo (B.S., ’74), owner of Silver Grill Café in Old Town Fort Collins, hosted students with the CSU Institute for Entrepreneurship for a restaurant tour and discussion in May. Arnolfo, who speaks frequently to College of Business students, bought the Silver Grill in 1979. Since then, he has quadrupled space at the restaurant, a beloved downtown breakfast spot known for its cinnamon rolls, expanding it from 40 seats to 150.

Gary K. Buffington (B.S., ’74) retired as director of the Department of Natural Resources for Larimer County, Colorado, after 44 years of public service. Under his leadership, Larimer County and local partners acquired more than 50,000 acres of open space over 18 years. He also worked in nine Colorado state parks as a ranger, park manager, and regional operations manager.

Irene Delka McCray (B.F.A., ’75) was among six alumni from the Department of Art and Art History whose work was recently featured in the Art of the State 2019 juried exhibition at the Arvada Center. The piece McCray showed is titled What Is Left, oil on canvas. Other artists and works included were: Chandler Romeo (B.F.A., ’82), Dakota: Geographic Tattoos, porcelain; Deb Komitor (M.F.A., ’83), Shining Through, oil painting; Corey Drieth (B.F.A., ’00), Transmigration, gesso and lacquer on wood; Mike Richins (B.F.A., ’00), With and Withhold, oil on linen; Libby Barbee (B.F.A., ’06), The Sound Mirror Project, compilation of photographs and audio. The exhibition received 1,555 submissions; only 154 works were selected.

Margaret Mizushima (M.S., ’75) is an author in Wellington, Colorado. Her recent suspense novel, Burning Ridge, published in a series called the “Timber Creek K-9 Mysteries,” has earned several notable honors, including a silver medal in the Benjamin Franklin Awards, conferred by the Independent Book Publishers Association. The book was also a finalist for a 2019 Colorado Book Award in the mystery category.

Nora Sparks (B.S., ’75) works as a programmer in the Employment Development Department for the state of California.

Steve Kanatzar (B.S., ’76), a former pilot, owns the Airplane Restaurant in Colorado Springs. An article published last year in 5280 magazine called it “one of Colorado’s most unusual – and interesting – places to enjoy a meal.” The restaurant features aeronautical memorabilia, and many of its seats are built into the belly of a restored Boeing KC-97 tanker. On Saturday mornings, the restaurant hosts local students for breakfast and tutoring in reading.

Radford “Skid” Hall (M.S., ’77; Ph.D., ’86) retired after 25 years as a lecturer in land-use control and environmental policy and planning at Stanford University. Hall, who obtained his master’s degree under the Corps Civil Works Fellowship Program, is also retired from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in San Francisco. He and his wife live in Pacifica, California, where he served on the city planning commission as a board member and as a past president of the Pacifica Land Trust. Having grown up in Colorado, he still misses his beautiful home state.

Diane D. Koster (B.S., ’77) recently retired as a middle-school educator in San Bernadino, California, and is providing public education about earthquake preparedness through her website, myeqpreppartner.com. She also has self-published a Kindle e-book for young adults, titled Shake Up Shake Down, which follows a group of teenagers who cope with the effects of a major earthquake that strikes Southern California while the students are at school; the three main characters help rescue their peers, then demonstrate the dos and don’ts of earthquake response.

Mark De Gregorio (B.S., ’79) retired after 25 years as founder and director of Rocky Mountain National Park’s education and outreach program. In 2013, he received the Enos Mills award, Colorado’s highest achievement in environmental education. Prior, he spent many seasons as a ranger in Colorado, Wyoming, and Alaska. In retirement, he continues work as a wildland firefighter and on the Wildland Firefighter Foundation board.

1980s

Julie Napier (B.A., ’80) is the senior veterinarian for Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium, ranked among the top in the world. She is active in the zoo’s Center for Conservation and Research, working with hyenas, lions, and black-backed jackals in Botswana and doing conservation work in South Africa, Belize, and Madagascar. Closer to home, she has done conservation work with pronghorn and bighorn sheep in Nebraska and Nevada. Napier serves as president of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians.

James Trotta (B.S., ’80) retired for the second time after serving as a New York state trooper for 30 years and as quartermaster for the Elsmere Fire District for seven years. He plans to volunteer for the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

1990s

Michelle (Ladner) Detry (B.S., ’90) is president and chief executive officer of Keystone International Inc., a veteran-owned business in Albuquerque, New Mexico, that specializes in organizational development, project management, and technical support services for government and industry. She was recently highlighted as one of “3 New Mexicans to know” in Albuquerque Business First. Detry and her husband, Rich (B.S., ’89; M.S., ’91), have a daughter, Anna, who is majoring in biochemistry and math at CSU.

Dean Hines (B.S., ’90; M.B.A., ’10) co-owns and runs the Welsh Rabbit cheese shop and bistro in Old Town Fort Collins with his wife, Nancy, and brother, Nate. The family business launched in 2012 after Hines earned a Master of Business Administration. He is also an instructor of management in CSU’s College of Business.

Todd Inglee (B.A., ’90) was named executive director of the Colorado Beef Council in February 2019 after serving in the role on an interim basis for about eight months. The council, based in Englewood, is funded by Colorado’s beef checkoff program and works to promote the state’s $3.4 billion beef industry through research, education, and marketing efforts. He has an array of experience in the cattle industry and previously served as president of the Colorado Cattlemen’s Association.

Carl Maxey (B.S., ’90), of Fort Collins, is vice president and Western region general manager for MGS Inc., a manufacturer of specialty equipment trailers and related products. He is also serving his third term on the board of directors for the National Association of Trailer Manufacturers, which supports the trailer manufacturing industry and its mission to promote highway and consumer safety.

Horst Meima (B.A., ’90), president and chief executive officer of VW Credit Inc., based in Herndon, Virginia, participated in the CSU College of Business’s 41st annual Business Day in April. Meima is also a member of the college’s Global Leadership Council. VW Credit is a $30 billion financial services company, serving Audi, Volkswagen, and Ducati customers.

Kara Johnston (B.A., ’91) recently became director of alumni and parent relations at Colorado Christian University in Lakewood. Her oldest son, Alec, is a cavalry scout in the U.S. Army and she has two teenage daughters, Molly and Elizabeth.

Tracy Nelson (B.S., ’91) was named director of the Colorado School of Public Health at CSU. Nelson is a professor in the Department of Health and Exercise Science; her research has focused on genetic and environmental risk factors and chronic disease outcomes.

James Shanahan (B.S., ’91) is vice president of financial regulatory compliance for CoBank, based in Metro Denver. He recently began serving on the Interest Rate Benchmark Reform Subcommittee for the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

Sean O’Connell (B.S., ’92; M.S., ’94) recently joined nationwide professional services firm Dewberry as manager of the company’s water and wastewater facilities group in Denver. He will lead the group that provides water and wastewater treatment services along the Front Range.

Linda Carpio Shapley (B.A., ’92) is director of customer experience at Deke Digital, an expert media company in the Denver area. She was earlier a newspaper journalist and worked for more than 20 years at The Denver Post, where she rose from copy editing and design to the position of managing editor, overseeing news operations. She helped lead the paper’s coverage of the Aurora theater shooting, which won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Reporting. Shapley is a member of the CSU Media Hall of Fame and is vice president of the board of directors for the Denver Press Club.

Scott Shuman (B.S., ’92) is a partner and auctioneer with Hall and Hall, a real estate marketing company focused on premier rural properties, with 20 regional offices in Colorado, Montana, Wyoming, Texas, and several other states. He has served as president and chair of the board of directors for the National Auctioneers Association and contributes to the University by conducting two annual fundraising auctions for CSU Athletics. Shuman, his wife, Krista, live with their three children near Eaton, Colorado.

Michelle Eccellente Stevenson (B.A., ’92) of Corpus Christi, Texas, is an artist and owner of MES Studio Art. She founded Cultivate Caring, an initiative that promotes caring about yourself, others, and the world.

Martha Tissot van Patot (M.S., ’92; Ph.D., ’94) is a cardiovascular pulmonary physiologist who worked at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and now is a self-employed writer focusing on hypoxia and respiration. She and her husband, Dr. Howard Seim, co-director of CSU’s Preclinical Surgical Research Laboratory, were world famous in early 2019 as a result of the breathtaking antics of their dog, Endo. The Labrador retriever – known as “Endo the jumping dog” – was captured on video as he repeatedly bounced to shoulder height while waiting at the reception desk of CSU’s James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital, where he had a foxtail seed removed from his ear. The video went viral on social media, with nearly 150 million views of Endo’s excited jumping.

Christina Boyd (B.A., ’94), a financial adviser at Merrill Lynch in Wayzata, Minnesota, was included in the Forbes 2018 list of “America’s Top 250 Wealth Advisors.” She has also been named on Forbes lists of “Top Women Advisors” and “Best-In-State Wealth Advisors.”

Joe Mazur (B.S., ’94) is weekend sports anchor and weekday sports reporter for ABC11 Eyewitness News, based in Durham, North Carolina. He has worked for the station since 2001 and has won multiple honors for broadcast sports news, including an Emmy for a special about the Dallas Cowboys. He regularly posts on Twitter about sports, focusing on everything from baseball to hockey.

Dawn DiPrince (B.A., ’95; M.A., ’12) recently became chief operating officer at History Colorado, a Denver-based charitable organization and agency of the Colorado Department of Higher Education that promotes statewide history, culture, community vitality, and human connections through programming at eight museums across the state. DiPrince has worked for History Colorado since 2012, earlier serving as chief community museum officer and director of El Pueblo History Museum in Pueblo, Colo. She hopes to help History Colorado integrate more fully with Colorado communities and their collective heritage.

Nicole Ehrhart (M.S., ’95), one of CSU’s foremost experts in translational medicine, was recently named director of the Columbine Health Systems Center for Healthy Aging, which is part of the University’s Health and Medical Center. Ehrhart is a veterinarian and professor of surgical oncology in CSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Her vision for the center is to create a place where various disciplines come together to extend healthspan, the period during which one is free of diseases that limit quality of life.

Scott Larsen (D.V.M., ’95; M.S., ’99) is vice president of animal health at Denver Zoo and is overseeing construction of a new state-of-the-art animal hospital at the zoo. The facility will give visitors an unobstructed view into treatment and operating rooms, offering new insights into the care of zoo animals. He has served as president of both the American College of Zoological Medicine and the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians.

Daniel Fuselier (B.S., ’97), of Templeton, California, is a counseling psychologist in private practice and recently published a memoir, In Pursuit of Calm. After attaining his bachelor’s degree at CSU, he earned a doctorate in counseling psychology at the University of Northern Colorado; in his book, he writes about his years at CSU with utmost fondness.

Jeff Kahl (B.S., ’97), with Colorado Springs Pediatric Dentistry, recently became president of the Colorado Dental Association. After earning his bachelor’s degree at CSU, Kahl obtained his dental degree at the University of Colorado and completed residencies with the National Naval Medical Center and Children’s Hospital Colorado. He has been active with professional organizations and in public-policy advocacy.

Brett Kaysen (B.S., ’97; M.Agr., ’03; Ph.D., ’13) is assistant vice president of sustainability for Pork Checkoff. The program collects revenue from nationwide hog farmers to fund research, education, and marketing administered by the National Pork Board to improve the pork industry. Kaysen was recently featured on the Farm, Food, Facts podcast to discuss how science and technology are enhancing animal care and the ability of farmers to meet global food needs. He and his wife, Tara (B.S., ’96; M.Ed., ’01), live with their children near Des Moines, Iowa. Tara is co-owner and lead herdsman of Kaysen Family Farms.

Noah Newman (B.A., ’97), Colorado Climate Center coordinator, spearheaded CSU’s participation in the Colorado Rockies’ 10th annual Weather and Science Day in April at Coors Field. About 12,000 students from Colorado and Wyoming schools, along with their teachers and parents, attended the event designed to interest kids in science, engineering, and math.

Scott Pettett (B.A., ’97), of Salt Lake City, Utah, works for my529, a nonprofit educational savings program, and pursues his passion for wildlife, nature, and sports photography through a side venture called Terra Firma Photography. This image of a snowy egret, taken at the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge near Brigham City, Utah, was recently named one of the 2019 Top 100 birdlife photos of the year by the National Audubon Society. It was selected from thousands of submitted images and is posted along with other winners on the Audubon website.

Niki Singlaub (B.S., ’97) of Bend, Oregon, created the Hydaway bottle, a BPA-free, collapsible, reusable water bottle available online.

Grant Bledsoe (B.S., ’98) earned the Certified Angus Beef 2018 Feedyard Commitment to Excellence award. He and his wife, Katie, accepted the honor at the organization’s annual conference in Maui, Hawaii. Bledsoe, who graduated in farm and ranch management, is managing partner of Bledsoe Cattle Co. in Wray, Colorado. It is a third-generation farming, ranching, and feeding operation started by his grandparents.

Nona Carroll (B.S., ’98), of Hanover, Maryland, is chief strategy officer for the Maryland Business Roundtable for Education. She oversees its Speakers Bureau, STEM Specialists in the Classroom, and Next Generation Scholars programs. Carroll was selected to be part of the class of 2019 for Leadership Maryland.

Louise Creager (B.S., ’98) is an associate with RE/MAX Alliance in Fort Collins and is celebrating 10 years in real estate, having begun her career in the business in 2009. She relishes the Northern Colorado outdoors.

Jen Buford (B.A, ’99) is a vice president and branch manager of two Chase Bank locations in Fort Collins. Buford was inducted into the Colorado State Athletics Hall of Fame in 2010 and helped lead the CSU softball team to its most successful season in school history.

Trevor Hahn (B.F.A., ’99) teamed with Melanie Knecht, a graduate student in music therapy, to promote adaptive outdoor recreation for people with disabilities. The duo, who call themselves “Hiking with Sight,” attracted worldwide media attention this summer as they trained to climb one of Colorado’s famed peaks above 14,000 feet. Knecht was born with spina bifida and uses a wheelchair; Hahn, a sculptor who works by touch, is an accomplished mountaineer who lost his vision to glaucoma several years ago. The pair took on a fourteener, with Hahn hiking and Knecht verbally guiding him from her vantage point in a specialized backpack. As they put it: He’s the hike, and she’s the sight; together they conquer mountains.

Wade Troxell (B.S., ’80; M.S., ’82; Ph.D., ’87) won a third term as mayor of Fort Collins in a city election April 2. He is now serving his final two-year term as elected leader of the city known for its livability, natural resources, and innovative spirit, with a population of more than 170,000 people. Troxell, a native of Fort Collins, earned three degrees in engineering at CSU and now is an associate professor of mechanical engineering at the University. He is a faculty member in the CSU Systems Engineering program and the Nancy Richardson Design Center. A fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Troxell specializes in autonomous robotic systems and intelligent distributed energy architectures; he has taught classes in engineering design and manufacturing and robotic systems, among others.

Wade Troxell (B.S., ’80; M.S., ’82; Ph.D., ’87)

He was recently named to the Federal Aviation Administration Drone Advisory Committee and completed the Bloomberg Harvard City Leadership program in the first cohort of 40 mayors. As a student in the late 1970s, Troxell was starting center on the Rams football team and co-captain of the team as a senior. He is married to Jean (Dumbauld) Troxell (B.F.A., ’81) and has two adult children, Graeme (B.A., ’13), a Ph.D. student in systems engineering at Cornell University, and Ellie (B.S., ’15; B.S., ’15; B.A., ’15), who is starting graduate studies at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Stephen C. Torbit (Ph.D., ’81) was recently honored by the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies for his conservation efforts. He was recognized for “outstanding contributions to the association and to the advancement of professional fish and wildlife management in North America.” 

Yvonne Myers (B.S., ’82) was honored as “Leading Lady” during the 2019 Women of Distinction awards ceremony sponsored by BizWest Media in April. Myers works as health systems director for Columbine Health Systems, which provides a range of health care services and supportive living communities for seniors in Fort Collins, Windsor, and Loveland. She is a passionate advocate for seniors and a longtime community volunteer in the arenas of health and education. Myers also is a member of the board of directors and past chair for the Fort Collins Area Chamber of Commerce.

Theresa Clark (B.A., ’84) joined the Florida State University Foundation as assistant director of prospect management after more than 13 years at Western Kentucky University in prospect research and management.

Brad Hoopes (B.S., ’84) launched a magazine for U.S. military veterans in Northern Colorado. The free monthly Remember and Honor publication made its debut in March and features veterans’ stories, as well as information about events, organizations, and services for Northern Colorado veterans. The magazine can be accessed at https://rememberandhonormagazine.com.

David Simmons (B.S., ’84) was elected to a four-year term as assessor in Teller County, Colorado, which spans a foothills region west of Colorado Springs. Simmons also serves as business director at Rocky Mountain Innovation Partners, an advanced technologies firm. He retired in 2011 from U.S. Space Command / Air National Guard as a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Air Force / Air National Guard; he had served in mobile combat operations. He lost his wife, Marcia Ann Simmons (B.S., ’83), to cancer on her birthday in 2006; she is survived by Simmons and their son, Benjamin.

Perry Solmonson (B.S., ’84) showed his Ram pride on the 20,305-foot summit of Island Peak in Nepal. When he isn’t mountaineering, Solmonson works as captain, check airman, and duty officer for Horizon Air, a regional carrier for Alaska Airlines based in Seattle. He earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering and lives in Portland, Oregon.

Perry Solmonson (B.S., '84)

Paula L. Cowen (D.V.M., ’85) recently retired from her longtime position as director of professional development for Veterinary Services in the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Cowen, who was based in Fort Collins, led training programs for federal, state, and U.S. military veterinarians to help maintain the health of nationwide animal herds and to ensure the safety of animal products and the food supply. Much of her work focused on disease monitoring among animals imported to and exported from the United States; she worked extensively with international veterinarians and veterinary organizations, coordinating the American Team for International Veterinary Affairs. She earned the 2011 International Veterinary Congress Prize from the American Veterinary Medical Association.

Doug Erler (B.A., ’85) heads the Weld County Justice Services Department, which delivers community corrections services, work release, electronic monitoring, pretrial services, and criminal justice analysis and planning for the county in northeastern Colorado. He was appointed by the governor to serve on the state Justice Assistance Grant Board and Community Corrections Advisory Council and is involved in many local, state, and national criminal justice system initiatives.

Mark Gauthier (B.S., ’85) serves as vice president of Cru, formerly Campus Crusade for Christ, and is executive director of the organization’s U.S. Campus Ministry. He joined Cru while at CSU and after graduation was assigned to Harvard University. He then began a ministry to 67 campuses in the Greater Boston area, followed by a move to Orlando, where he led a division of Cru teams.

Connie Hanrahan (attended 1984-1985) owns Mantooth Marketing in Fort Collins, a finalist in the 2018 Top Company Awards from ColoradoBiz magazine. Hanrahan started the business in 1995; it has grown to include a full range of services in public relations, advertising, design, and events management. The company has also been recognized by the Fort Collins Chamber of Commerce and BizWest Media.

Tom Leahy (B.S., ’85) was named in September 2018 as president of Brock White Construction Materials, a Construction Supply Group company. Based in St. Paul, Minnesota, the company has 18 locations throughout the upper Midwest.

Mike Lester (B.S., ’85) is marking his sixth year as state forester and director of the Colorado State Forest Service, a CSU outreach agency that protects the state’s forest resources, provides forestry education and technical assistance to landowners, and carries out duties of the Division of Forestry in the Colorado Department of Natural Resources. He earlier held a leadership role in the Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry.

Jim DeFede (attended 1981-1986) has worked for 12 years as an investigative reporter at CBS4 News in Miami and hosts the station’s Sunday morning public affairs program, Facing South Florida.  He won a 2019 Alfred I. duPont Award from Columbia Journalism School for his work reporting, writing, and producing an hourlong documentary called The Everglades: Where Politics, Money and Race Collide, an examination of the environmental, political, and social roots of Florida’s contaminated Everglades. The duPont-Columbia Awards uphold the highest standards in journalism. DeFede, who studied political science at CSU, was student body president from 1984 to 1985 and got his start in journalism at the Rocky Mountain Collegian. After CSU, he worked as a reporter for The Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Washingon, and moved to South Florida in 1991 to become a staff writer for Miami New Times. He is a former metro columnist for The Miami Herald. DeFede has won seven regional Emmy Awards since joining CBS4 News.

Cheryl Zimlich (B.S., ’86)
Cheryl Zimlich (B.S., ’86) Photo: Joe A. Mendoza / Colorado State University

Cheryl Zimlich (B.S., ’86) was honored for her work in nonprofit human services during the 2019 Women of Distinction awards ceremony sponsored by BizWest Media in April. Zimlich is executive director of Bohemian Foundation, a private family foundation based in Fort Collins that supports local, national, and global efforts to build strong communities through creativity and innovation. The foundation has significantly enlivened Northern Colorado music and arts and has supported numerous human-service agencies that help children, families, and individuals.

Jan Iron (B.A., ’86) received a Multicultural Staff and Faculty Network Distinguished Service Award at the 2019 Celebrate! CSU Awards. Iron, an information technology specialist for CSU’s Agricultural Experiment Station, is longtime president of the Northern Colorado Intertribal Pow-wow Association, which celebrates and helps preserve Native American culture by holding an annual spring powwow in Fort Collins, among other activities (A scene from the annual event is pictured above). Iron’s award recognizes outstanding contributions to diversity, inclusive excellence, and multiculturalism at the University and in the broader community.

Jan Iron (B.A., '86)
Jan Iron (B.A., '86) Photo by Mary Neiberg

Doug Erler (B.A., ’85) heads the Weld County Justice Services Department, which delivers community corrections services, work release, electronic monitoring, pretrial services, and criminal justice analysis and planning for the county in northeastern Colorado. He was appointed by the governor to serve on the state Justice Assistance Grant Board and Community Corrections Advisory Council and is involved in many local, state, and national criminal justice system initiatives.

Mark Gauthier (B.S., ’85) serves as vice president of Cru, formerly Campus Crusade for Christ, and is executive director of the organization’s U.S. Campus Ministry. He joined Cru while at CSU and after graduation was assigned to Harvard University. He then began a ministry to 67 campuses in the Greater Boston area, followed by a move to Orlando, where he led a division of Cru teams.

Connie Hanrahan (attended 1984-1985) owns Mantooth Marketing in Fort Collins, a finalist in the 2018 Top Company Awards from ColoradoBiz magazine. Hanrahan started the business in 1995; it has grown to include a full range of services in public relations, advertising, design, and events management. The company has also been recognized by the Fort Collins Chamber of Commerce and BizWest Media.

Tom Leahy (B.S., ’85) was named in September 2018 as president of Brock White Construction Materials, a Construction Supply Group company. Based in St. Paul, Minnesota, the company has 18 locations throughout the upper Midwest.

Mike Lester (B.S., ’85) is marking his sixth year as state forester and director of the Colorado State Forest Service, a CSU outreach agency that protects the state’s forest resources, provides forestry education and technical assistance to landowners, and carries out duties of the Division of Forestry in the Colorado Department of Natural Resources. He earlier held a leadership role in the Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry.

Jim DeFede (attended 1981-1986) has worked for 12 years as an investigative reporter at CBS4 News in Miami and hosts the station’s Sunday morning public affairs program, Facing South Florida.  He won a 2019 Alfred I. duPont Award from Columbia Journalism School for his work reporting, writing, and producing an hourlong documentary called The Everglades: Where Politics, Money and Race Collide, an examination of the environmental, political, and social roots of Florida’s contaminated Everglades. The duPont-Columbia Awards uphold the highest standards in journalism. DeFede, who studied political science at CSU, was student body president from 1984 to 1985 and got his start in journalism at the Rocky Mountain Collegian. After CSU, he worked as a reporter for The Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Washingon, and moved to South Florida in 1991 to become a staff writer for Miami New Times. He is a former metro columnist for The Miami Herald. DeFede has won seven regional Emmy Awards since joining CBS4 News.

Dan Hammerschmidt (B.A., ’87) played safety for the CSU Rams then went on to a career in coaching. Early in his career, he coached football at Texas Christian University, Duke, and Virginia Military Institute. He returned to his alma mater to coach receivers from 1996-2000 and again in the 2010 and 2011 seasons. He also spent two years coaching in the National Football League with the Houston Texans and coached at the University of Houston. Since 2015, he has coached safeties at Oklahoma State University.

David Holland (B.S., ’87) is manager of change control in the information technology division of the Regional Transportation District in Denver. He also serves as an assistant coach for the Denver East High School boys basketball team, a perennial presence in the state championship tournament.

Morris Price Jr. (B.A., ’87) is vice president and executive director of City Year Denver, an organization that recruits AmeriCorps members to serve full time in elementary, middle, and high schools, working with low-income populations. The AmeriCorps members collaborate with teachers to encourage growth and achievement among students, aiming to decrease urban dropout rates. Nine recent CSU graduates are on the team.

Todd A. Shetter (B.A., ’87), chief operating officer of ActivCare Living Inc., has been appointed to a three-year term on the Alzheimer’s Advisory Committee for the California Health and Human Services Agency. The committee represents consumers, care providers, and advocates of those living with Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders.

Sam Aldern (M.Ed., ’88) of Fort Collins, a retired teacher and principal, published a young adult novel, Brad Bateman; Brat Ratman. His son, Jackson (B.A., ’18), illustrated the cover, maps, and chapter headings.

Joe Cervi (B.A., ’88) recently started work as a public relations specialist for the Pueblo Board of Water Works. He earlier served as technical editor for Transportation Technology Center Inc., a subsidiary of the Association of American Railroads headquartered in Pueblo. Before starting a career in public relations, Cervi was a columnist and longtime sports editor at the Pueblo Chieftain, where he wrote about sports for nearly 25 years.

Thomas Z. Tan (M.S., ’88), of Irvine, California, ran the Revel Big Bear Marathon at Redlands, California, in October 2018, his 10th full marathon.

Basuki Hadimuljono (M.S., ’89; Ph.D., ’92) is minister of public works and public housing for Indonesia.  He helped respond after a tsunami struck the Sunda Strait in December 2018, killing hundreds and causing widespread damage. He earlier directed large public housing projects and the construction of roads and reservoirs. Hadimuljono has held leadership roles in Indonesian government since 2005.

Jannine Mohr (B.A., ’89), an attorney in the Office of the General Counsel at Colorado State University, was recently promoted to the senior leadership position of deputy general counsel, overseeing the legal office on the Fort Collins campus. She joined the University legal team in 2008; much of her work has focused on employment law and constitutional issues. Before joining CSU, Mohr worked in Denver as a trial attorney in private practice. She also serves as chair of the Colorado Limited Gaming Control Commission and teaches a CSU course, Law in Student Affairs, for graduate students in the School of Education.

David Thaemert (B.S., ’89) recently started a new position as a senior lecturer in civil engineering hydraulics and river engineering at the University of Hertfordshire in Hatfield, United Kingdom.

1990s

Michelle (Ladner) Detry (B.S., ’90) is president and chief executive officer of Keystone International Inc., a veteran-owned business in Albuquerque, New Mexico, that specializes in organizational development, project management, and technical support services for government and industry. She was recently highlighted as one of “3 New Mexicans to know” in Albuquerque Business First. Detry and her husband, Rich (B.S., ’89; M.S., ’91), have a daughter, Anna, who is majoring in biochemistry and math at CSU.

Dean Hines (B.S., ’90; M.B.A., ’10) co-owns and runs the Welsh Rabbit cheese shop and bistro in Old Town Fort Collins with his wife, Nancy, and brother, Nate. The family business launched in 2012 after Hines earned a Master of Business Administration. He is also an instructor of management in CSU’s College of Business.

Todd Inglee (B.A., ’90) was named executive director of the Colorado Beef Council in February 2019 after serving in the role on an interim basis for about eight months. The council, based in Englewood, is funded by Colorado’s beef checkoff program and works to promote the state’s $3.4 billion beef industry through research, education, and marketing efforts. He has an array of experience in the cattle industry and previously served as president of the Colorado Cattlemen’s Association.

Carl Maxey (B.S., ’90), of Fort Collins, is vice president and Western region general manager for MGS Inc., a manufacturer of specialty equipment trailers and related products. He is also serving his third term on the board of directors for the National Association of Trailer Manufacturers, which supports the trailer manufacturing industry and its mission to promote highway and consumer safety.

Horst Meima (B.A., ’90), president and chief executive officer of VW Credit Inc., based in Herndon, Virginia, participated in the CSU College of Business’s 41st annual Business Day in April. Meima is also a member of the college’s Global Leadership Council. VW Credit is a $30 billion financial services company, serving Audi, Volkswagen, and Ducati customers.

Kara Johnston (B.A., ’91) recently became director of alumni and parent relations at Colorado Christian University in Lakewood. Her oldest son, Alec, is a cavalry scout in the U.S. Army and she has two teenage daughters, Molly and Elizabeth.

Tracy Nelson (B.S., ’91) was named director of the Colorado School of Public Health at CSU. Nelson is a professor in the Department of Health and Exercise Science; her research has focused on genetic and environmental risk factors and chronic disease outcomes.

James Shanahan (B.S., ’91) is vice president of financial regulatory compliance for CoBank, based in Metro Denver. He recently began serving on the Interest Rate Benchmark Reform Subcommittee for the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

Sean O’Connell (B.S., ’92; M.S., ’94) recently joined nationwide professional services firm Dewberry as manager of the company’s water and wastewater facilities group in Denver. He will lead the group that provides water and wastewater treatment services along the Front Range.

Linda Carpio Shapley (B.A., ’92) is director of customer experience at Deke Digital, an expert media company in the Denver area. She was earlier a newspaper journalist and worked for more than 20 years at The Denver Post, where she rose from copy editing and design to the position of managing editor, overseeing news operations. She helped lead the paper’s coverage of the Aurora theater shooting, which won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Reporting. Shapley is a member of the CSU Media Hall of Fame and is vice president of the board of directors for the Denver Press Club.

Scott Shuman (B.S., ’92) is a partner and auctioneer with Hall and Hall, a real estate marketing company focused on premier rural properties, with 20 regional offices in Colorado, Montana, Wyoming, Texas, and several other states. He has served as president and chair of the board of directors for the National Auctioneers Association and contributes to the University by conducting two annual fundraising auctions for CSU Athletics. Shuman, his wife, Krista, live with their three children near Eaton, Colorado.

Michelle Eccellente Stevenson (B.A., ’92) of Corpus Christi, Texas, is an artist and owner of MES Studio Art. She founded Cultivate Caring, an initiative that promotes caring about yourself, others, and the world.

Martha Tissot van Patot (M.S., ’92; Ph.D., ’94) is a cardiovascular pulmonary physiologist who worked at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and now is a self-employed writer focusing on hypoxia and respiration. She and her husband, Dr. Howard Seim, co-director of CSU’s Preclinical Surgical Research Laboratory, were world famous in early 2019 as a result of the breathtaking antics of their dog, Endo. The Labrador retriever – known as “Endo the jumping dog” – was captured on video as he repeatedly bounced to shoulder height while waiting at the reception desk of CSU’s James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital, where he had a foxtail seed removed from his ear. The video went viral on social media, with nearly 150 million views of Endo’s excited jumping.

Martha Tissot van Patot (M.S., '92, Ph.D., '94)

Christina Boyd (B.A., ’94), a financial adviser at Merrill Lynch in Wayzata, Minnesota, was included in the Forbes 2018 list of “America’s Top 250 Wealth Advisors.” She has also been named on Forbes lists of “Top Women Advisors” and “Best-In-State Wealth Advisors.”

Joe Mazur (B.S., ’94) is weekend sports anchor and weekday sports reporter for ABC11 Eyewitness News, based in Durham, North Carolina. He has worked for the station since 2001 and has won multiple honors for broadcast sports news, including an Emmy for a special about the Dallas Cowboys. He regularly posts on Twitter about sports, focusing on everything from baseball to hockey.

Dawn DiPrince (B.A., ’95; M.A., ’12) recently became chief operating officer at History Colorado, a Denver-based charitable organization and agency of the Colorado Department of Higher Education that promotes statewide history, culture, community vitality, and human connections through programming at eight museums across the state. DiPrince has worked for History Colorado since 2012, earlier serving as chief community museum officer and director of El Pueblo History Museum in Pueblo, Colo. She hopes to help History Colorado integrate more fully with Colorado communities and their collective heritage.

Nicole Ehrhart (M.S., ’95), one of CSU’s foremost experts in translational medicine, was recently named director of the Columbine Health Systems Center for Healthy Aging, which is part of the University’s Health and Medical Center. Ehrhart is a veterinarian and professor of surgical oncology in CSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Her vision for the center is to create a place where various disciplines come together to extend healthspan, the period during which one is free of diseases that limit quality of life.

Scott Larsen (D.V.M., ’95; M.S., ’99) is vice president of animal health at Denver Zoo and is overseeing construction of a new state-of-the-art animal hospital at the zoo. The facility will give visitors an unobstructed view into treatment and operating rooms, offering new insights into the care of zoo animals. He has served as president of both the American College of Zoological Medicine and the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians.

Daniel Fuselier (B.S., ’97), of Templeton, California, is a counseling psychologist in private practice and recently published a memoir, In Pursuit of Calm. After attaining his bachelor’s degree at CSU, he earned a doctorate in counseling psychology at the University of Northern Colorado; in his book, he writes about his years at CSU with utmost fondness.

Jeff Kahl (B.S., ’97), with Colorado Springs Pediatric Dentistry, recently became president of the Colorado Dental Association. After earning his bachelor’s degree at CSU, Kahl obtained his dental degree at the University of Colorado and completed residencies with the National Naval Medical Center and Children’s Hospital Colorado. He has been active with professional organizations and in public-policy advocacy.

Brett Kaysen (B.S., ’97; M.Agr., ’03; Ph.D., ’13) is assistant vice president of sustainability for Pork Checkoff. The program collects revenue from nationwide hog farmers to fund research, education, and marketing administered by the National Pork Board to improve the pork industry. Kaysen was recently featured on the Farm, Food, Facts podcast to discuss how science and technology are enhancing animal care and the ability of farmers to meet global food needs. He and his wife, Tara (B.S., ’96; M.Ed., ’01), live with their children near Des Moines, Iowa. Tara is co-owner and lead herdsman of Kaysen Family Farms.

Noah Newman (B.A., ’97), Colorado Climate Center coordinator, spearheaded CSU’s participation in the Colorado Rockies’ 10th annual Weather and Science Day in April at Coors Field. About 12,000 students from Colorado and Wyoming schools, along with their teachers and parents, attended the event designed to interest kids in science, engineering, and math.

Photo by Scott Pettett (B.A., '97)
Photo by Scott Pettett (B.A., '97)

Scott Pettett (B.A., ’97), of Salt Lake City, Utah, works for my529, a nonprofit educational savings program, and pursues his passion for wildlife, nature, and sports photography through a side venture called Terra Firma Photography. This image of a snowy egret, taken at the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge near Brigham City, Utah, was recently named one of the 2019 Top 100 birdlife photos of the year by the National Audubon Society. It was selected from thousands of submitted images and is posted along with other winners on the Audubon website.

Niki Singlaub (B.S., ’97) of Bend, Oregon, created the Hydaway bottle, a BPA-free, collapsible, reusable water bottle available online.

Grant Bledsoe (B.S., ’98) earned the Certified Angus Beef 2018 Feedyard Commitment to Excellence award. He and his wife, Katie, accepted the honor at the organization’s annual conference in Maui, Hawaii. Bledsoe, who graduated in farm and ranch management, is managing partner of Bledsoe Cattle Co. in Wray, Colorado. It is a third-generation farming, ranching, and feeding operation started by his grandparents.

Nona Carroll (B.S., ’98), of Hanover, Maryland, is chief strategy officer for the Maryland Business Roundtable for Education. She oversees its Speakers Bureau, STEM Specialists in the Classroom, and Next Generation Scholars programs. Carroll was selected to be part of the class of 2019 for Leadership Maryland.

Louise Creager (B.S., ’98) is an associate with RE/MAX Alliance in Fort Collins and is celebrating 10 years in real estate, having begun her career in the business in 2009. She relishes the Northern Colorado outdoors.

Jen Buford (B.A, ’99) is a vice president and branch manager of two Chase Bank locations in Fort Collins. Buford was inducted into the Colorado State Athletics Hall of Fame in 2010 and helped lead the CSU softball team to its most successful season in school history.

Trevor Hahn (B.F.A., ’99) teamed with Melanie Knecht, a graduate student in music therapy, to promote adaptive outdoor recreation for people with disabilities. The duo, who call themselves “Hiking with Sight,” attracted worldwide media attention this summer as they trained to climb one of Colorado’s famed peaks above 14,000 feet. Knecht was born with spina bifida and uses a wheelchair; Hahn, a sculptor who works by touch, is an accomplished mountaineer who lost his vision to glaucoma several years ago. The pair took on a fourteener, with Hahn hiking and Knecht verbally guiding him from her vantage point in a specialized backpack. As they put it: He’s the hike, and she’s the sight; together they conquer mountains.

2000s

Reza Zadeh (attended 1996-2000), of Fort Collins, is Front Range director for Athletes in Action, a branch of Cru Ministries that works with Christian athletes. He also serves as team chaplain for the Denver Broncos. Zadeh, who was born in Iran and immigrated to the United States as a preschooler, played linebacker for the Rams football team and later discovered his passion for ministering to professional and college athletes. He was recently featured on the Sports Spectrum podcast.

Matthew Staver (B.S., ’01) is a freelance photographer and photojournalist based in Denver who started his career working for CSU student media and since has shot multiple stories for The New York Times, among other clients.  In one recent project, he provided aerial drone video for a news investigation and film by FRONTLINE and the Wall Street Journal, titled Predator on the Reservation, about a doctor indicted for assaulting Native American children. En route to assignments, Staver has taken a series of images called “On the Road” taken in North Dakota.

House in snowy North Dakota by Matthew Staver
A view of a red building sitting on the frozen landscape in North Dakota, U.S., on Monday December 17, 2012. This was captured while on assignment for The New York Times on a story about the impact of the oil boom on the small towns of Montana that border North Dakota. Photographer: Matthew Staver ©Matthew Staver ALL RIGHTS RESERVED http://www.matthewstaver.com This photograph is a non-traditional portrait of a landscape. An attempt to capture the ethereal spirit of place as I pass. This photograph is just one in an ongoing series of similar landscape portraits I call "On The Road". Often my work takes me to remote or rural locations that require hours of driving to reach. The spaces and places in between offer their beauty as the miles roll by. With these photographs I hope to capture a bit of the soul of the land I pass and a glimpse into the lives lived upon it.

Juliet Cutler (M.A., ’02) published a memoir, Among the Maasai, about the profound ways her involvement with Maasai girls over the past 20 years has shaped her life. Beginning in 1999, Cutler spent two years as a volunteer teacher at the first school for Maasai girls in Tanzania. She has returned almost yearly since and continues to be an activist for girls’ education worldwide.

Kristy Pabilonia (D.V.M., ’02; Ph.D., ’12) received the Distinguished Service Award from the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians, recognizing efforts to enrich and advance the field of veterinary diagnostic medicine; she serves as an executive officer of the organization. Pabilonia is an expert in avian diseases – those that affect birds and commercially important poultry, often with implications for human health – and is an associate professor in CSU’s Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology. Pabilonia is serving as interim director of CSU’s Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories.

Chicken sitting on Kristy Pabilonia's shoulder
Colorado State University Poultry Program Specialist Dr. Kristy Pabilonia (D.V.M., '02, Ph.D. '12) talks about the "The Basics of Raising Backyard Chickens" during the Veterinary Teaching Hospital Open House, April 5, 2013.

Margit Hentschel (M.S., ’03; Ph.D., ’15) received the Margaret B. Hazaleus Award at the 2019 Celebrate! CSU Awards, for long-term efforts to enhance opportunities and the campus environment for women. Hentschel is the co-founder and director of CSU’s Center for Mindfulness and is director of the Office of Service-Learning at CSU’s Institute for Learning and Teaching.

Justin Bradshaw (B.S., ’04) of Eagle, Colorado, co-founded Rever, a motorcycle navigation and ride-sharing app. The free app helps riders create custom routes, track rides, and share their riding experiences across social platforms. Created in 2015, it is nearing 1 million users in more than 140 countries.

Nate Haas (B.S., ’05) is co-owner of Krazy Karl’s Pizza in Fort Collins. It was the city’s busiest independent pizzeria in 2018, according to the Hot 100 list in the trade magazine, Pizza Today, and recently remodeled and added seating at its Campus West location. The pizzeria, founded in 2010, added a second location in 2016.

Kevin Mark (B.A., ’05) is vice president of field ministry for the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, based in Dallas. He was a kicker for Rams football from 2002 to 2005.

Stephanie (B.S., ’05) and Sean (B.S., ’05) Richardson were named to the 2019 list of 20 Under 40 by Sky-Hi News in Grand County, Colorado. The Richardsons, who own Maverick’s Grille in Granby, volunteer with several organizations, including the National Sports Center for the Disabled, where they help children with disabilities learn to enjoy cross-country skiing and snowboarding.

Martha Weidmann (B.F.A., ’05) is co-founder of NINE dot ARTS, an art consulting and curating firm based in Denver that envisions, curates, and installs large-scale art experiences for corporations and public spaces. The firm has received accolades for installations at the Dairy Block, Colorado Convention Center, and The Crawford Hotel at Union Station and has been selected to curate artwork for the new CSU Campus at the redeveloped National Western Center in north Denver. The center will be a year-round hub for events, scientific collaboration, and public education; art installations on the site of three CSU buildings will connect visitors with the themes of food, water, sustainability, and health.

Nicole Yost (B.A., ’05) was named 2019 Public Relations Person of the Year by the Colorado chapter of the Public Relations Society of America. Yost is founder and chief communicator of Fyn Public Relations in Loveland, Colorado. She also is a professional adviser for CSU’s Public Relations Student Society of America chapter.

Brian Johanson (B.A., ’06), of Fort Collins, formed a band called Sugar Britches with Josh Long; the duo play original “high-brow honky tonk” throughout Colorado, and recently released an album titled Don’t Make Her a Mixtape Yet, You Idiot! Johanson also works as a solo musician. Westword recently published an article about his work in the state’s country music scene.

J.T. English (B.S., ’07) is pastor of training at The Village Church, north of Dallas, Texas. In the role, he supports individuals who want to go into the ministry. He earned a master’s degree at Dallas Theological Seminary and a doctorate at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.

Ryan Henderson (B.S., ’07; M.S., ’08) and his brother, Ross (B.S., ’11), became veterinarians after their undergraduate work at CSU. They star in an Animal Planet show called Hanging With the Hendersons, which premiered in early 2019 and highlights their work at Fox Hollow Animal Hospital in Lakewood, Colorado, a clinic founded by their father. The television series emerged after a video of Ross and a patient went viral on social media. The video featured the young veterinarian playing guitar and crooning the Elvis Presley song “Can’t Help Falling in Love” to a nervous dog before spay surgery.

Rebecca (Box) Reif (B.A., ’08) has been elected shareholder at Ahlers & Cooney, a law firm headquartered in Des Moines, Iowa. Reif is a member of the firm’s public and private law practice, with a focus on employment law, education law, and litigation. She is a graduate of Drake University Law School.

Toni-Lee Viney (M.A., ’08) received a Jack E. Cermak Advising Award at the 2019 Celebrate! CSU Awards. Viney, who has been advising CSU students since 2008, teaches yoga in her spare time. The award recognizes excellence in academic advising.

Dr.'s Anthony, Ryan and Ross Henderson with three dogs and a guitar
Ryan Henderson (B.S., ’07; M.S., ’08) and his brother, Ross (B.S., ’11) - Photo courtesy of Animal Planet.

Abigail (B.A., ’09; B.F.A., ’09) Noah (B.S., ’07) Dalton own ConTRAPtions, an escape room enterprise they opened in Fort Collins in 2016. Earlier this year, the venue added a third escape room, Plight of the Margo. The sci-fi-themed experience joins the two original escape rooms, Mafia Gallery and Tiger’s Eye. The two collaborate on puzzle design, while Noah handles the technical details and installation, and Abigail creates the storyline, clues, and artwork.

Patrick Randall (B.S., ’09) has been named to the 2019 list of 20 Under 40 by Sky-Hi News in Grand County, Colorado. Randall is part owner of his family’s Never Summer Mountain Products in Grand Lake, which offers camping gear, sporting goods, and outdoor apparel. He sits on the boards of the Rocky Mountain Repertory Theatre and Grand Lake Chamber.

Susan Harness
Photo of Susan Harness (M.A. '06, M.A. '16) by Cassie Rosch (B.A., ’09)
Hana'a Thigeel
Photo of Hana'a Thigeel (M.S., '10, Ph.D., '16) by Cassie Rosch (B.A., ’09)
Mary Ontiveros
Photo of Mary Ontiveros (B.S., '73, M.Ed., '79) by Cassie Rosch (B.A., ’09)

Cassie Rosch (B.A., ’09) is a professional photographer in Fort Collins who recently photographed two dozen CSU students, faculty, staff, and alumnae for “Portraits of Resiliency,” a campus exhibit timed to International Women’s Day and co-sponsored by the Office of International Programs and Women & Philanthropy. Alumnae featured in the exhibit included Susan Harness (M.A., ’06; M.A., ’16), a Native American author whose memoir, Bitterroot: A Salish Memoir of Transracial Adoption, was a finalist in the creative nonfiction category of the 2019 Colorado Book Awards; Blanche Hughes (M.S., ’84; Ph.D., ’95), CSU vice president for student affairs; Dana Hughes (B.S., ’98), senior communications officer for the United Nations Refugee Agency in Africa; Mary Ontiveros (B.S., ’73; M.Ed, ’79), CSU vice president for diversity; and Hana’a Thigeel (M.S., ’10; Ph.D., ’16), who was severely injured in a bomb explosion in her home country of Iraq and, with the support of a sponsor, traveled to Northern Colorado to seek medical care and complete graduate studies in nutrition and epidemiology.

2010s

Kellie Walters (M.S., ’10) is an assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology at California State University, Long Beach, and studies the relationships between physical activity and psychosocial health in adolescent girls and their mothers. Walters and Chrissy Chard (B.S., ’07; M.S., ’11; Ph.D., ’14) co-founded Smart Fit Womxn, a fitness coaching business, and the nonprofit Smart Fit Girls, which aims to improve the physical and emotional well-being of adolescent girls.

Steve Keller (B.S., ’11) is an engineering technician with Engineering Analytics in Fort Collins. He has been working on soil sampling at Rocky Flats, a 6,200-acre national wildlife refuge northwest of Denver that, for 40 years, was home to a nuclear weapons manufacturing site. The sampling is being conducted ahead of plans to build trails, a pedestrian bridge, and the Jefferson Parkway.

Menyas Borocz (M.M.P., ’12) owner of the La Piadina Italian flatbread food truck, opened a stationary location at The Exchange in Fort Collins. The new eatery features an expanded menu, including sandwiches and salads, as well as beer and wine.

Kacie Herman (B.S., ’12) is a subcontract administrator for Lockheed Martin in central Florida, where she works with the Fleet Ballistic Missile program, which builds the submarine-launched D5 Trident II missile. Previously, she was with Lockheed near San Francisco, specializing in large contracts for its satellite program.

Stacey Putka (B.S., ’12) is program director for Defy Ventures Colorado, a nonprofit that strives to transform the lives of business leaders and incarcerated individuals by encouraging collaboration that helps people with criminal histories to forge new paths as entrepreneurs. Putka began the job after earning a master’s degree in social work and practicing as a clinical therapist.

Evan Antin (D.V.M., ’13) is a veterinarian at Conejo Valley Veterinary Hospital near Los Angeles and for years has used social media platforms to share his interest in wildlife species around the world. He has more than 1 million followers on Instagram. Now Antin’s work is reaching an even wider audience: In early 2019, Animal Planet debuted Evan Goes Wild, a series that highlights Antin’s interests in animal medicine, wildlife conservation, and international adventure. The new series has Antin swimming with humpback whales in Tahiti, exploring caves with bats and snakes in the Philippines, and tangling with crocs in the Yucatan, among other adventures.

Evan Antin with elephant
Evan Antin (D.V.M., '13)

Amy Franklin (D.V.M., ’13) is founder, chief executive officer, and president of Farms for Orphans, a nonprofit working to help build agricultural infrastructure to produce food in developing nations. Franklin, who lives in Loveland, Colorado, decided to pursue the charitable venture during a summer internship, when she witnessed the extreme poverty and poor nutritional status of children in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Much of her work focuses on providing reliable sources of nutrient-rich food for vulnerable children. In December, she received the International Humanitarian Award from the United Nations Association for Northern Colorado.

Dorian Green (B.S., ’13) was recently named assistant coach of men’s basketball at the University of Northern Colorado. Green was a star of the CSU men’s team while earning his degree in health and exercise science. He was the sixth-leading scorer in Rams basketball history, and fourth in career assists. He started in 130 games while playing at CSU – the most in program history – and helped lead the Rams to the national tournament in 2012 and 2013. Before joining the Bears in Greeley, Green earned a master’s degree in educational administration at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln.

Sarah Triplett (B.S., ’13) was recently promoted to zookeeping manager and registrar at Butterfly Pavilion in Westminster, the world’s only standalone invertebrate zoo accredited by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums. Triplett oversees breeding, feeding, housing, and record-keeping for more than 7,000 individual invertebrates representing nearly 400 species at the pavilion. She also supervises staff and college interns involved with research and other programs at the popular attraction near Denver.

Eric Byington (M.B.A., ’14) owns Queen City Collective Coffee in Denver with his brothers, Scott and Luke. They aim to create community through a sustainable farm-to-cup business model and work directly with small coffee farmers in Columbia, Rwanda, and Ethiopia. The company name references Denver – known as the “Queen City of the Plains” – and the women who run farming cooperatives that supply the shop’s coffee.

Renee Ormond (B.A., ’14), who graduated in international studies, has received a Fulbright Award that will allow her to enroll for a year in a master’s program at University of East Anglia in Norwich, England, to study international development.

Sarah Triplett with insects
Sarah Triplett (B.S., '13)

Alina Osika (B.M., ’14; M.A.L.C.M., ’16) joined Salt Lake Community College’s Institutional Marketing and Communications department in May as a graphic designer.

Caley Follmer (B.S., ’15) is a human capital analyst for Lockheed Martin in Colorado, focusing on workforce planning and strategic development.

Carmelo (M.B.A., ’15) and Emma Mannino (M.P.H., ’16) appeared on the television game show Wheel of Fortune in February. The newlyweds, who live in Fort Collins, competed against two other couples during a “Sweetheart’s Week” show timed to Valentine’s Day. They won cash and prizes, including a trip to Hawaii and a 2019 Jaguar E-Pace SUV. In their regular lives, Carmelo is chief executive officer of a web-based startup called STOW IT, which connects vehicle owners with people who have vehicle storage space to rent, like an Airbnb that enables affordable and easily accessible vehicle storage. Emma is a web developer in the CSU Office of the Vice President for Research.

Dantiel “Tiel” Daniels (B.A., ’16; M.Ed., ’19) recently completed his master’s degree in education and human resource studies online while playing professional basketball in China.

Melissa Rudd
Melissa Rudd (B.M., '16) - Photo by Dyann DIercks Photography

Marissa Rudd (B.M., ’16) made her symphonic debut at Boettcher Concert Hall in Denver; she was featured vocalist with the Colorado Symphony for its annual Comic Con concert.

Randy Clark (M.B.A., ’17) completed the Harvard Business School Advanced Management Program and was promoted to president of the Medical Systems Group for Olympus Corporation of the Americas, based near Boston.

Amy Haggard (M.S., ’17) moved to Tallahassee, Florida, accepting a position at Florida State University as the assistant director of alumni and student engagement for honors, scholars, and fellows.

Alexis Haskins (B.S., ’17), who recently graduated in natural resources, has received a Fulbright Award that will allow her to spend 10 months at the University of Helsinki in Finland studying nature-based solutions for immune diseases that are thought to be caused by environmental factors.

Grant Larson (B.A., ’17) is coordinator of digital media, public relations, and marketing for the Denver Outlaws, a Major League Lacrosse team based at the Broncos Stadium at Mile High. He landed the job after an internship through the Denver Broncos Sport Management Institute at CSU.

Carlee Craddock (B.S., ’18) is corporate and community relations coordinator for Children’s Hospital Colorado in Colorado Springs.

Jonathan Dobson (B.S., ’18) graduated from the University’s multidisciplinary Fermentation Science and Technology Program and landed a job as a distiller at Stranahan’s Colorado Whiskey, which produces single-malt whiskey at its distillery in Denver.

Matthew Hanson (B.S., ’18) is using his degree in landscape architecture to start a design career with studioINSITE, with offices in Denver and Omaha, Nebraska.

Jonah Landy (B.S., ’18) has been named to the 2019 list of 20 Under 40 by Sky-Hi News in Grand County, Colorado. Landy is an entrepreneur and restaurateur who co-owns Squeaky B’s, Cork on the Water, Lulu City, and Farmhouse through the Flannel & Tie Hospitality Group. He serves on the board of the Grand Lake Chamber and was instrumental in establishing a teaching farm in Uganda to help local communities develop sustainable agriculture.

Hailey
Hailey Frederiksen (B.S., ’19) - Photo by Chelsea Stockton (B.F.A., ’12) of PhotoChic Imagery and Design

Hailey Frederiksen (B.S., ’19) will be crowned Miss Rodeo Colorado 2020 during the National Western Stock Show in Denver in January. Frederiksen recently earned her bachelor’s degree in animal science, with a minor in agricultural business, and will spend the coming year traveling Colorado and the nation to represent rodeo and agriculture. This photograph of Frederiksen was taken by another alumna, Chelsea Stockton (B.F.A., ’12), of Beulah, Colorado, who owns a business called PhotoChic Imagery and Design.